Smart fridges have been the laughing stock at IoT (Internet of Things) conventions for the past few years, but that’s all about to change. Many people believe smart fridges are way too fancy for an appliance whose simple job is to keep food cold. But there are actually some major advantages to having a smart fridge.

We researched the pros and cons of having a smart fridge, so you can make the ultimate decision as to whether one will find a home in your kitchen or not.

Before we begin, the fridge we are using as inspiration for this post is the Samsung Family Hub. It’s received the best reviews in the industry. If you’re going to make the investment (see Con #1), you may as well do it intelligently (no pun intended) and get the best one available.


PRO #1: It’s Energy Efficient.

Your smart fridge could save you around $5 per month. That’s not a lot of money, but on the grand scale of things, it can make a very big impact on the environment. Your current fridge runs day and night all year long. But as soon as you insert processing power, networking and memory into a fridge, you suddenly gain much more dynamic control.

If your smart fridge promises not to run a defrost cycle between 2pm and 6pm, this could be helpful for local utility companies. During hot summer days, energy will surge and it can cause utility companies to experience power spikes. This is not only very expensive, but also not great for the environment. The utility company will probably only offer you about $5 for your positive initiatives, but hey, at least it’s something.

If enough people get smart fridges, it could save utility companies hundreds of thousands of dollars, which at the end of the day, will also impact your wallet for the better. So when purchasing your smart fridge, just remind yourself that you’re helping the planet while giving your kitchen a cool upgrade, too.

CON #1: It’s Expensive.

The Family Hub smart fridge has all of the bells and whistles, but it definitely comes at a major cost. The cheapest one you’ll find will go for $3,499 and the most expensive option is $4,999. The good news is they are often on sale for as much as $500-$900 off.

The more expensive options are bigger in size and have more doors and compartments. They also may have more cooling options. But all of them feature the Family Hub technology, which is the best part. So, how much you spend depends on how big you want to go.

PRO #2: It’s Extra Helpful.

Like all smart technology, smart fridges will make your life easier. When it comes to food management, you can: make shopping lists, order groceries directly from the fridge and even see inside your fridge when you’re at the store. The smart screen also lets you manage family schedules and display pictures, so your fridge isn’t cluttered up all the time.

The coolest capabilities are that you can look up different recipes, play songs off Spotify and even mirror your Samsung TV right on your fridge, so you can easily catch the news while prepping dinner.

CON #2: It’s not Essential.

Last but not least, the final con is that a smart fridge really isn’t necessary. Smart fridges are definitely a luxury item. It’s still easy to look up recipes, get groceries delivered or check out the family’s schedule by using your phone. And if you’re at the store and unsure if the ketchup’s low, you can just buy some. The truth is, we’ve gotten by for a long, long time without smart fridges and they aren’t a revolutionary, life-altering product.

But that’s not to say a smart fridge would be awesome to have.

Final Remarks:

So, what do you think? Would a smart fridge be worth it to you? If your answer is YES, then consider looking into it now so you can take advantage of all its perks during the holiday season. It surely would make hosting Thanksgiving dinner a lot more enticing.

 

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